All posts by scottpgoodman@gmail.com

Good Work Gallery Presents at the Know Wave Holiday Party at Santos Party House with unveiling of backlight murals by Scott Goodman – Friday December 18th 2015_content

 

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    Good Work Gallery invites you to the unveiling of new wall pieces by Scott Goodman in conjunction with The Moran Bondaroff Holiday Party and Knowledge Wave at  Santos Party House. The evening will feature performances curated by Sara Blazej in which performers Bebe Yama, Rebecca Fin SimonettiSADAF and others will offer complementary views on the topic of visual disruption familiar to Goodman’s work.

Being activated by black light, the murals’ lines bear an iridescent, foggy glow that belies their ostensibly flat, graphic means of articulation. Similarly oppositional, as this soft glow is, to the hard lines it emanates from. Its rigid pattern defines within each mural, that which is established only to relax and dissolve. Square tiling in the stairwell to the south of the venue undulates like caustic light at the bottom of a swimming pool. While a stone wall in the north stairwell swirls like cappuccino foam in the hands of an expert barista. Patio rocks warp, torque and flex around the venue’s upstairs room leaving viewers immersed in an interior space made of exterior features that is as hard and flat as it is malleable and soft.

Scott Goodman was born in 1983, is a graduate of The Cooper Union, and is the founder of Good Work Gallery.

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Blood Suckers: A Show About Vampires_Content

Clark Filio

  • Clark Filio, Purple Demon With Wings, Oil on canvas board, 24″x30″

Blood Suckers: A Show About Vampires

Curated by Scott Goodman

Dean Cercone
Trenton Duerksen
Etienne Pierre Duguay & Domain
Devon Clapp
Clark Filio
Daniele Frazier
Aaron Johnson 
Devin Kenny
Kaitlin Till-Landry
Jawhan Massie
Chris Oh
Saki Sato
Taylor Shields
Matt Taber
Faren Ziello

Opening reception: Saturday October 31st from 7 pm – 10 pm

October 31st – November 15th, 2016

 

Artist: Kaitlin Till-Landry Title: Red Scan
Date: 2015
Medium: Digital video

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THE LORAX POEMS, October 3rd – 18th, 2015 – content

 

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Good Work Gallery is pleased to present The Lorax Poems, a group exhibition curated by Zach Smith, featuring:

Michael Assiff
Morgan Blair
Mikkel Carl
Carson Fisk-Vittori
Ani Geragosian
Ella Goerner
Cecilia Salama
Jo Shane

Opening October 3rd, 6pm to 9pm

The show navigates the space between science and poetry. Subsisting off a media diet by turns populist and academic, it highlights artists for whom environmental awareness takes myriad forms. Hopefully, here, a paean to the natural world emerges.

“All day most days we adapt in microscopic ways, folding our habits in upon themselves. When possible we entertain eclectic viewpoints, scan bursts of image and descriptions, flit through global events like specks on a windshield. Through artisanal everything and a deluge of apps we enter feedback loops of self-fulfilling innovation. We teeter on the edge of a legitimately vicious cycle: changing how we change, improving on ways we improve. And if it was too late we probably wouldn’t know… which all sounds pretty pessimistic, as it’s intended to.

We need tons of inconvenient truths constantly hurled at us, even as time renders most of them unfounded, bogus and annoying. A select few may turn out very real, to resonate and shake our plodding dialogue into new shapes, which art as a micro-world and the real world as itself need to thrive.

Unfortunately, full-blown jeremiads don’t do well with audiences. So to protect this one from the dull ears it might fall on otherwise, one revered literary figure comes to mind.

The Lorax is forest entity famous for saying things nobody wants to hear. A living torrent of dissent, this Dr. Seuss masterstroke eventually becomes so grating that self-banishment seems like the right thing to do. He disappears forever at which point everyone misses him. Turns out he was right about a lot of stuff, chiefly that the natural world demands our full attention.

This exhibition gathers, far and wide, the work of artists who encounter nature as built on something akin to poetry, more than just a string of networks. To get there though, they embrace absolutely current science and up-to-date academic research. The cohort’s output also speaks of lucid familiarity with hypermodern, urbane lifestyles. So, a rare balance is struck here between sublime encounters with the uncanny and snapshots of our feverish half-digital everyday, all maintaining a taste for empirical detail. This omnivorous approach opens new avenues for brazen lateral conjecture and hermetic leaps of faith.

It’s an approach that found a patron saint in the poet Bill Knott (1940-2014), who remained polarizing across decades of a singular literary career. He lobbed disruptive game-changing ideas into the American poetry community, while moving further and further off the grid. The effect was of digging one’s heels in so far they stick out the other side. By warping contemporary views of authorship and the tenuous state of publishing to his own ends, Knott pioneered confessional transparency, fearless of oversharing.

With Knott and The Lorax as spirit animals, these works together might suggest an ethereal register of protest, at which one could speak on issues too abstract to gain their footing in a larger dialogue. They could be ideas too far in the future or not widely understood enough, waiting on a dedicated few to translate. This goes for art, technology, the natural world, and all combinations thereof. For example, we continue fetishizing speed, so why get equally high off stillness? Neither is any more intellectually rigorous than the other. Not to mention both waste labor, resources, and time. The sun also rises on a global, virtual city that, while evolving exponentially, feels it doesn’t need to sleep. Hopefully, throughout The Lorax Poems expertise emboldens impulse, overflowing into strategies of note to those who would ‘speak for the trees.'” -Zach Smith

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Jonathan Basile: Fictional Archives, Archival Fictions, September 11, 2015 – content

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Jonathan Basile: Fictional Archives, Archival Fictions

Friday September 11th, 8—10pm

A lecture and discussion exploring the online universal library, libraryofbabel.info

ONE NIGHT ONLY — libraryofbabel.info is a virtual recreation of an idea that has inspired philosophers and poets from the Ancient Greek Atomists to Jorge Luis Borges. By permuting a complete set of letters and punctuation, one can arrive at every possible utterance, including past and future literary masterpieces and day to day conversations. We will gather to consider together how the concepts of presence and absence, invention and discovery, and novelty and repetition can be undermined by the universal library, and how any archive can exist without physical form, embedded in the essence of language.

Jonathan Basile is a fiction writer, philosopher, and computer programmer. He created an online universal library (https://libraryofbabel.info/) and universal image archive (https://babelia.libraryofbabel.info/). He has written about his work in Flavorwire (http://flavorwire.com/515783/brooklyn-author-recreates-borges-library-of-babel-as-infinite-website) and The Paris Review Daily (http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2015/07/23/the-library-of-babel-as-seen-from-within/).

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This Dog Needs A Name, July 18th – August 8th, 2015 – content

 

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Link to Press Release

Good Work Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition and book launch for  “This Dog Needs A Name”, a group exhibition and book organized by Kerry Cox and featuring works by:

Anna Adler
Caitlin Baucomb
Courtney Childress
Erin Marie Dunne
Samantha Harmon
Dominique Hurth
Honey McMoney
Reuben Lorch Miller
Adam Pape
Ryann Slauson
Erin Sweeny
& Frank Traynor

Book featuring works and essays by:

Anna Adler
Caitlin Baucomb
Christiana Cefalu
Courtney Childress
Kerry Cox
Erin Marie Dunne
Daniel Esparza
Samantha Harmon
Dominique Hurth
Honey McMoney
Edgar Meza
Reuben Lorch Miller
Adam Pape
Ryann Slauson
Erin Sweeny
& Frank Traynor

Opening Saturday July 18:
Performances by Honey McMoney and Anna Adler

Screening of Sam Harmon’s Untitled (green)

Closing Saturday August 8:
Performance by Caitlin Baucomb

“This Dog Needs A Name” is the first in a series of annual or semi annual exhibitions called the “Notebook Series” that is also a book. Assuming the role of artist as curator, I am tracing common interests across a group of friends and acquaintances. The artists and writers included here often use fictitious elements to create non-fictitious narratives, or glean elements from non-fiction to create fictions. They are interested in character development through objects and use elements of surreality to bring us into commonplace themes. Also, this show is based on the following story.

One warm night a few weeks ago some friends and I found a dog in Bed Stuy. She had no collar but was well groomed and a nice guy from the neighborhood was feeding her canned food on paper plate. For the next twelve hours, this dog was all we could talk about. We had no idea where she came from but we wanted to make sure she was taken care of. We began to refer to her as “Choochi”, after Socrates Bueno, the Lower East Side Barber. That night, a kid decided to take her home to see if he could keep her, or until we could figure out something more permanent. In the morning, he told us his mom wouldn’t let him keep her. He had decided to sell her for $150. It took ten minutes. We never even knew her name.

Like Choochi, all the works in this show are the product of a narrative that may be real or imagined. In Samantha Harmon’s video “Untitled (green)”, Harmon portrays a hedge fund manager who laments not becoming an artist. In this confessional video portrait, Harmon’s character matches her clothing to money and tells us about her ideas for art projects. In works from his photo series “Blunts and Skunks” Adam Pape fixes his lens on the nighttime life of Dyckman Park in Inwood creating an eerie Lynchian documentary photo series. In Ryann Slauson’s sculpture “Preservation”, a paper mache bicycle wheel hangs from a branch, a scene of a possible suburban melodrama or the result of an abandoned petit theft.

The “This Dog Needs A Name” book features collaborations between artists and writers whose work has similar connective tissue. It serves as a sort of expanded exhibition catalog and independent work of print in its own write. It is produced by EAT editions in an edition of 50 and available for sale, here.

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